OCTOBER BREAK: CANCELLED

That’s right. This year when you pack up your dirty laundry and head home for a hiatus from the jam-packed first semester, cherish the moment a little extra, as this will be the last time fall break is incorporated into the academic calendar. The College of the Holy Cross has traditionally allowed for an extended, week-long break from classes centered around Columbus Day weekend, allowing students to go home, regroup mentally, and bring back all the snacks and supplies they blew through in the first couple of weeks. However, after the publication of Dr. Flynn’s research in July of 2015 on the effects that breaks from classes have on students’ academic performances, Holy Cross decided it would be beneficial to cancel this ridiculously prolonged break and allow for a few extra sessions of class. High schools across the United States that have recently started to follow Dr. Flynn’s model for limited breaks to enhance students’ motivation have witnessed a sudden spike in students’ GPAs. The research findings showed that after allowing students to take a lengthy break from school, their test scores decreased by approximately 25%. It was concluded that in order to optimize academic performance, all high schools and colleges across the nation should slowly transition to this model of short breaks sporadically spaced throughout the semester. As everyone knows, Holy Cross has a profound dedication to allowing students to reach their potential in the classroom and to take every opportunity to “ask more.”  What better way to allow for a little extra learning than to cancel October break?

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